Mountain Biking as an Olympic Sport

Mountain Biking pic

Mountain Biking
Image: olympic.org

The recipient of multiple graduate degrees, including a master of business administration from the University of Chicago, John Heintz is a senior legal consultant for Lydian, Inc., a firm he co-founded in 2013. He also recently served at Niles Township High School District 19, where he was the chief legal officer. When he isn’t working, John Heintz enjoys mountain biking in Chicago and surrounding areas.

Mountain biking began as a fringe sport in California during the 1970s following the development of bicycles that could better handle the bumpy off-road terrain. The creation of the Repack Downhill race in 1976 helped establish mountain biking as a competitive sport and, seven years later, a national mountain bike championship was established. The sport’s first ever world championships were held in 1990, and six years later it was granted status as an Olympic discipline at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Bart Brentjens of the Netherlands became the first man to win gold in the cross country event after finishing first in the two-hour-plus race, while Italy’s Paola Pezzo was the first woman to win gold. The sport has since been contested at six Summer Olympics and five individuals have won multiple medals, including both Brentjens and Pezzo. Other multiple medal winners include Julien Absalon and Miguel Martinez of France, as well as Sabine Spitz of Germany.

How Testing Bolsters Learning

Second Rail Education pic

Second Rail Education
Image: secondrail.com

A former assistant superintendent and chief legal officer with Niles Township High School District 219 in Skokie, Illinois, John Heintz is a co-founder of Lydian, a management consulting firm headquartered in Chicago. John Heintz also writes content for Second Rail Education, a blog he founded as a way to explore key educational issues in Chicago and beyond.

Critics have railed against increased standardized testing demands ever since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in the early 2000s. While standardized testing can detract from nuanced, individualized education, it is important to understand the importance of frequent testing, regardless of whether it is standardized or not.

Research has demonstrated that taking a test greatly improves the learner’s ability to retain material in the long term. According to a study performed by researchers at Washington University, the so-called “testing effect” on learning holds true even when students perform poorly on a test or receive no feedback on missed information. In the same vein, Harvard psychology professor William James famously postulated that attempts to retrieve information from memory improve retention far more than simply looking for the answer in a textbook.

One major criticism of standardized testing centers on the fact that it tests the sum total of students’ knowledge, meaning that little to no learning actually takes place. “Formative assessments,” on the other hand, are designed to expose gaps in knowledge and ultimately contribute to the learning process.

Using Technology as an Educational Tool

 

Technology pic

Technology
Image: educationworld.com

Chicago education professional John Heintz has worked in a range of roles during his career, serving as a classroom teacher, legal consultant, and education entrepreneur. Before becoming chief legal officer and assistant superintendent at Niles Township High School District 219, near Chicago, John Heintz spent more than 15 years as a language and writing educator.

In the classroom setting, technology plays an increasingly prominent role, such that the teachers of the future will likely rely on technology as an indispensable component of classroom instruction. Considering that teachers have used videos for decades, it should come as no surprise that video streaming has become a ubiquitous activity in the classroom. Educational video developers such as Khan Academy and free video lectures from Stanford University make learning more accessible than ever before. Streaming video does not have to replace classroom teaching, but it can be used to supplement important lessons.

Although social media has been well documented as an in-class distractor, it can have merit if used in the right way. Teachers can post topics for discussion and solicit responses from students, keeping them engaged in the learning process long after the bell rings. Social media also gives students an opportunity to share resources and learning strategies with each other.